Session Info

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3 Day IPLA for Institutions

Virginia S. Lee Philippa Levy Billy O’Steen Rachel Spronken-Smith Catherine Chiappetta-Swanson

This year’s IPLA will offer an additional program feature: a 3-day Institute on Inquiry as a Way of Learning in Colleges and Universities for institutions that wish to institutionalize inquiry-guided learning at the department or university level. Through a Call for Applications with an initial deadline of January 10, 2014, a limited number of institutional teams will be accepted. Leading the Institute are a group of international scholars with special expertise in implementing IGL campus-wide: : Billy O’Steen (University of Canterbury, New Zealand); Rachel Spronken-Smith (University of Otago, New Zealand); Philippa Levy (Higher Education Academy, UK); Catherine Swanson (McMaster University, Canada); Virginia Lee (Higher Education Consultant, USA).

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4 Day IPLA for Faculty

Tuesday / Wednesday

Note: Applicants select ONE track for Tuesday/Wednesday

Engaging Students in Research and Inquiry

Our argument is that ‘all undergraduate students in all higher education institutions should experience learning through and about research’ (Healey and Jenkins 2009, 3). Here it is suggested that the key to mainstreaming research and inquiry at undergraduate level is to integrate it into the curriculum. The workshop will:

  • explore the variety of ways in which research and inquiry based learning are undertaken in Bachelor programmes from first year to final year using numerous mini-case studies from different disciplines, departments and institutions in North America, Europe, and Australasia;
  • investigate practical ways of designing research and inquiry based learning into courses; and
  • facilitate participants in designing research and inquiry based learning activities for their courses.
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Carolyn Oxenford Michael Schuchert Liane Summerfield
Carolyn Oxenford Michael Schuchert Liane Summerfield
Marymount University

Course Design for Inquiry-Guided Learning

Targeted towards those who are ready to move from trying out an inquiry guided learning activity in an existing course to designing or a redesigning a course with IGL as one of the fundamental principles, this session will combine course design basics with further exploration of IGL across the disciplines. The interactive workshop will include a brief overview of the IGL program at Miami University, an exploration of a variety of approaches to inquiry-guided learning, and a step by step course design process in which assessment of student learning is foregrounded. Time to work on your course and inquiry activities and consult with the leaders and other participants is built in throughout the workshop, so participants are encouraged to bring syllabi and/or class activity/assignment materials to work on during the workshop.

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Inquiry-based Approaches in Undergraduate Science Courses: Learning Science Through Science Process

Inquiry-based approaches which facilitate the learning of science through science process have been shown to improve conceptual understanding, develop essential competencies, foster a deeper understanding of science, and influence attitudes toward science in general. This interactive workshop will explore a range of inquiry-based learning approaches in undergraduate science education, from guided inquiries to extended authentic inquiries. Participants will have the opportunity to develop or enhance inquiry-based learning modules and well-designed assessments for and of learning in their own courses.

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Thursday / Friday

Note: Applicants select ONE track for Thursday/Friday

Nancy Chick
Nancy Chick
Vanderbilt University

It Begins with a Question: Student Learning and the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)

Teaching and Learning Through Inquiry (Lee, 2004) serves as a good reminder that deep learning often begins with questions, is driven by curiosity, explores problems, is supported by a community, and may result in multiple answers. So, too, is the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). Instead of merely observing our students learning (or not), we can participate in an inquiry-guided teaching that actively asks questions we care about, explores the related problems, relies on the wisdom of our colleagues and our students, and leads to possible answers we share with our peers. In this workshop, participants will begin with a question—and plan a SoTL project.

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Michael McQuaide
Michael McQuaide
Emory University

Bringing an “off-campus” Component to the Undergraduate Curriculum

This session brings into focus the goals, and necessary resources of creating courses that remove students from the physical location of their college campus. The virtues of an off-campus component of a course is the possibility to bring students to the issue. Bringing students to the physical location that allows for first-person experience with both the issue and persons attempting to address the issue. An important goal of an off-campus curriculum is to increase civic competencies, especially the cognitive ability to make important connections between our private and public lives. Every decision that we make, even the most intimate ones, have social consequences. Offering opportunities for undergraduate to participate in issues where the issues emerge allows for a greater and immediate awareness of the dynamics inherent in each field of study. The sessions will focus on the challenges of recruiting, funding, and the logistics of such off-campus experiences.

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A Domain of Your Own

Experience how you and your students may build personal, unique and expansive digital domains to publish and archive intellectual work throughout the college career and life beyond. You will register and create a personal and working Internet domain for yourself and utilize various information tools (and discuss appropriate composition concerns) to create an online representation of your multiple scholarly pursuits and work. This track covers technical, design and writing skills and issues.

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Teaching International Students: Challenges and Solutions

Students from all over the world enroll in increasing numbers in U.S. universities and their varied linguistic and cultural backgrounds pose many challenges for university faculty who often have little or no training in meeting the specific needs of these students.The focus of this session is on strategies for working with non-native English speakers to help them succeed in academic coursework, and suggestions for fostering a mutually rewarding experience.

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